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If you're looking to get in touch with us, please contact us at: Marshall Amplification plc, Denbigh Road, Bletchley, Milton Keynes, MK1 1DQ You can contact us on 01908 375411 or for any other query please email: [email protected] queries related to your speakers or headphones please head to: order for us to effectively deal with your request, you must let us know your name, email address, daytime telephone and country.If your enquiry is related to a product you own, please include the model and serial number to help us deal with your issue.I won’t write the rest because it may confuse you even more. It’s important to note that, for example, a 1959 amp has nothing to do with the The JTM-45 JTM-45 with “block” logo The first Marshall ever made. The front panel has “Presence”, “Bass”, “Middle” and “Treble” controls, as well as 2 volumes and 4 inputs.It was basically a copy of the 1959 Fender Bassman. In 1965, the plexiglass faceplates were introduced.But many guitarrists also decided to try those and they found out that they could get really interesting tones with them. If you thought a Marshall Super Lead was already too loud. Blackmore’s amps had extra power tubes, making it even more powerful, as well as extra gain stages. They are easy to tell apart because the two extra knobs (“speed” and “intensity”) on the front panel.

Related to the #1987 and the #1959 respectively, they were designed for bass players. It’s 200W of pure loudness The Marshall Major 200w has a different circuit than its “little brothers”: the pre-amp has two ECC83s, but the third tube (the “driver tube”) is an ECC82 (a.k.a. Ritchie Blackmore was a famous user of the Major, but they were heavily modded at the Marshall factory (as said in an interview) and later by a man called John Dawk. These amps also CAN NOT TAKE ANY KIND OF BOOST OR OVERDRIVE. These amps would blow because they were already working at critical point without anything, so if you plugged something to make them run even hotter… This is one of the reasons why the Major was discontinued in 1974. Note: 8 knobs instead of 6 These amps had an extra 12ax7 tube for the “tremolo” effect.

The JTM-45/ 100 (JTM-100) The JTM-45/100 with the “block” logo Pete Townshend and John Entwistle of The Who needed amps that could overpower the noisy and energetic crowds.

Marshall then “hot-rodded” the JTM-45 using four KT66 and two 50w output transformers to handle the extra wattage. The result was the JTM-45/100 (JTM-100, for short).

Eric Clapton used a JTM-45 combo on the legendary (Now you know why this amp was called “Bluesbreaker” : P) He used his Les Paul through the Normal Channel of the amp. The then “horrible” distorted and saturated sound turned into what we know today as the “rock tone” (maybe not yet… Another example of this amp can be heard on AC/DC’s This is a confusing era, with lots of changes and new models. 😛 The transitition from the JTM to the JMP amps happened, in my view, with three steps.

He discovered that, by playing really loud, it would start to “break up”. The first one was the creation of the first 100w amp.

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